George, 2003

 Baghdad by George, 10:10am Seattle, 9:10pm, Baghdad, 2003 (with Woody Sullivan)  Metal, paint, vinyl  This statue of George Washington on the University of Washington, Seattle campus was co-opted as the gnomon in this giant horizontal sundial; his head indicated the time in Baghdad as it crossed the yellow hour marker lines. Temporary installation for Spheres, the 2003 University of Washington Summer ARTS Festival, Seattle, WA.

Baghdad by George, 10:10am Seattle, 9:10pm, Baghdad, 2003 (with Woody Sullivan)

Metal, paint, vinyl

This statue of George Washington on the University of Washington, Seattle campus was co-opted as the gnomon in this giant horizontal sundial; his head indicated the time in Baghdad as it crossed the yellow hour marker lines. Temporary installation for Spheres, the 2003 University of Washington Summer ARTS Festival, Seattle, WA.

 

Solar arcade, 2003

 (with Woody Sullivan)   Metal, paint    In winter, the spotlight appears high above.   The projection of light through a huge circular SW facing window between Allen and Suzzallo Libraries was utilized to tell solar time. 4 ellipses (2 of which were partially on the library walls) were marked to indicate the path of the sunspot on the summer solstice (June 21, 2:10-4:30 Pacific Daylight Time).    In the winter, the sunspot appears high above. Inspired by the aperture sundials created by 17th century astronomers in European cathedrals. Temporary installation for Spheres, the 2003 University of Washington Summer ARTS Festival.  

(with Woody Sullivan)  
Metal, paint 

 In winter, the spotlight appears high above. 

The projection of light through a huge circular SW facing window between Allen and Suzzallo Libraries was utilized to tell solar time. 4 ellipses (2 of which were partially on the library walls) were marked to indicate the path of the sunspot on the summer solstice (June 21, 2:10-4:30 Pacific Daylight Time).  

In the winter, the sunspot appears high above. Inspired by the aperture sundials created by 17th century astronomers in European cathedrals. Temporary installation for Spheres, the 2003 University of Washington Summer ARTS Festival.
 

 
 

Skylight Aperture Sundial, 2006

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Skylight Aperture Sundial, 2006

Seattle Public Library: Montlake Branch

Glass, skylight, steel: skylight 15x5ft, glass discs 20 in


5 glass discs in the ceiling (covered by a large skylight) project a row of colorful sunspots that slide through the library as the sun appears to move from East to West.
The orange disc is the “nodus” or time indicator.  As its projection crosses a line on the library floor, it is solar noon. Floor markings indicate where this sunspot lands at noon on the summer solstice, the opening date of the library––and the equinoxes. By night, artificial lights illuminate the colored discs.
In the 17th and 18th century, astronomers installed single apertures in European cathedrals for astronomical observations. Likewise, the Library is now a small observatory that makes the earth’s movements publicly visible and meaningful.
Commission by the Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs & the Seattle Public Library.  Project Partners: Weinstein Architects. Consultant: Woody Sullivan.  Permanent installation.

 

 Detail: Installation view looking East

Detail: Installation view looking East

 Looking east:  Skylight Aperture Sundial , Summer Solstice, June 21, 2006   

Looking east: Skylight Aperture Sundial, Summer Solstice, June 21, 2006   

 Looking north:  Skylight Aperture Sundial , Equinox

Looking north: Skylight Aperture Sundial, Equinox

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Seattle Chairs, 2013

 Seattle Chairs: 9am, Noon, 3pm Winter Solstice, Equinox, Summer Solstice, 2013  Wood, acrylic paint; 10’ x 20’ x 10’  The shadows from 3 chairs are described as if the walls to the south, east and west of the gallery have disappeared for Seattle at 9am, Noon and 3pm on the Winter Solstice (purple), Equinox (green) and Summer Solstice (Orange). Installed at the Jacob Lawrence Gallery, University of Washington, Seattle.

Seattle Chairs: 9am, Noon, 3pm Winter Solstice, Equinox, Summer Solstice, 2013

Wood, acrylic paint; 10’ x 20’ x 10’

The shadows from 3 chairs are described as if the walls to the south, east and west of the gallery have disappeared for Seattle at 9am, Noon and 3pm on the Winter Solstice (purple), Equinox (green) and Summer Solstice (Orange). Installed at the Jacob Lawrence Gallery, University of Washington, Seattle.

 
 

Shenzhen Dial Pro, 2008

 Tape  25 x 60 feet  Patterns cast by the skylight are marked through the days on June 25 and August 14, 2008 in the Shenzhen Institute of Fine Art Gallery, Shenzhen, PRC.

Tape

25 x 60 feet

Patterns cast by the skylight are marked through the days on June 25 and August 14, 2008 in the Shenzhen Institute of Fine Art Gallery, Shenzhen, PRC.

 
 

Oculus Table, 2013

 with Astro-biologist Woody Sullivan  Steel, vinyl, glass, 33x28x28 in  The Terrace Observatory, Exploratorium: Museum of Science, Art and Perception, San Francisco, CA.  Conceived for visitor interaction with the architectural oculus (a 28” aperture) in the ceiling. Visitors align the rolling table with the spot of sunlight and visible landmarks on the horizon. Time and date are indicated by the shadow cast on the interior of the large hemisphere.

with Astro-biologist Woody Sullivan

Steel, vinyl, glass, 33x28x28 in

The Terrace Observatory, Exploratorium: Museum of Science, Art and Perception, San Francisco, CA.

Conceived for visitor interaction with the architectural oculus (a 28” aperture) in the ceiling. Visitors align the rolling table with the spot of sunlight and visible landmarks on the horizon. Time and date are indicated by the shadow cast on the interior of the large hemisphere.

 Oculus Table, with docents

Oculus Table, with docents

 
 

Butt Dial, 2013

 Butt Dial: Prototype for Larger Work, 2013                       Plastic, paint  The shadows from each animal were traced on a heliodon (an apparatus that mimics the sun) according to the latitude at which they lived or live, ie. the panda was traced for the latitude of 30˚ at each hour through the day. The dinosaur is positioned on the top of the wall, as they have been found as far north as 80˚.   And the elephant ranges at 10˚.  Purple represents what their shadows would look like at several hours through the day on the winter solstice, green represents their shadows on the equinox and orange was used to trace their shadows for the summer solstice.

Butt Dial: Prototype for Larger Work, 2013                     

Plastic, paint

The shadows from each animal were traced on a heliodon (an apparatus that mimics the sun) according to the latitude at which they lived or live, ie. the panda was traced for the latitude of 30˚ at each hour through the day. The dinosaur is positioned on the top of the wall, as they have been found as far north as 80˚.   And the elephant ranges at 10˚.

Purple represents what their shadows would look like at several hours through the day on the winter solstice, green represents their shadows on the equinox and orange was used to trace their shadows for the summer solstice.

 Butt Dial, detail

Butt Dial, detail

 
 
 

Another Light, 2006

 Digital print 24x78 in  … hourly by sunlight and moonlight at Snoqualmie Pass, WA, 8:23am-4:23pm; 6:15pm-4:15am, February 11-12, 2006.   Left:  my shadow by sunlight.  Right:  my shadow by moonlight.

Digital print 24x78 in

… hourly by sunlight and moonlight at Snoqualmie Pass, WA, 8:23am-4:23pm; 6:15pm-4:15am, February 11-12, 2006.

Left: my shadow by sunlight. Right: my shadow by moonlight.

 
 

Solar Hour Benches, 2013

 with Astro-biologist Woody Sullivan  The Terrace Observatory, Exploratorium: Museum of Science, Art and Perception, San Francisco, CA  Corian, steel, wood, 6 ea. 17x18x60 in  6 oval benches together constitute a unique “hour planes” sundial. Each is aligned with the sun according to the hour it represents, ie. 10am, 11am, Noon, 1pm, 2pm or 3pm solar time. 40 minutes before and after the corresponding hour, sunlight projects through the 9 in. slit aperture onto the ground, indicating time and date. When the yellow window, or nodus, in the slit of light crosses the line created by the row of white markers on the ground, it is the solar hour.  Scientific and cultural aspects of time and sundials are also depicted on each bench.

with Astro-biologist Woody Sullivan

The Terrace Observatory, Exploratorium: Museum of Science, Art and Perception, San Francisco, CA

Corian, steel, wood, 6 ea. 17x18x60 in

6 oval benches together constitute a unique “hour planes” sundial. Each is aligned with the sun according to the hour it represents, ie. 10am, 11am, Noon, 1pm, 2pm or 3pm solar time. 40 minutes before and after the corresponding hour, sunlight projects through the 9 in. slit aperture onto the ground, indicating time and date. When the yellow window, or nodus, in the slit of light crosses the line created by the row of white markers on the ground, it is the solar hour.  Scientific and cultural aspects of time and sundials are also depicted on each bench.

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 Noon, solar mark

Noon, solar mark

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