Lunar Drift: Sun and Moon Pointers, 2014

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 with Paul DeMarinis  Aluminum, electronics, glass, steel, digital prints, acrylic  Washington State Arts Commission in partnership with Western Washington University for Miller Study Hall, Bellingham, WA.  Two slow-time kinetic sculptures continually track the moon & the sun, whether above or below the horizon, in daylight or night, clear skies or overcast. By observing the relationship between the sun & the moon pointers, the current phase of the Moon can be understood. For ex., when the moon is full, the sun pointer will be pointing directly in the opposite direction of the moon pointer.

with Paul DeMarinis

Aluminum, electronics, glass, steel, digital prints, acrylic

Washington State Arts Commission in partnership with Western Washington University for Miller Study Hall, Bellingham, WA.

Two slow-time kinetic sculptures continually track the moon & the sun, whether above or below the horizon, in daylight or night, clear skies or overcast. By observing the relationship between the sun & the moon pointers, the current phase of the Moon can be understood. For ex., when the moon is full, the sun pointer will be pointing directly in the opposite direction of the moon pointer.

 South wall - light and weather of the daylight sky averaged once a month (vertically), three times of day specific to Bellingham

South wall - light and weather of the daylight sky averaged once a month (vertically), three times of day specific to Bellingham

 West wall - graphics feature phases of the moon each night at transit from Bellingham for 2014 (sourced from NASA)

West wall - graphics feature phases of the moon each night at transit from Bellingham for 2014 (sourced from NASA)

 Detail of mechatronic sun and moon pointers

Detail of mechatronic sun and moon pointers

 
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 Details

Details

 
 

Solar Hour Benches, 2013

 with Astro-biologist Woody Sullivan  The Terrace Observatory, Exploratorium: Museum of Science, Art and Perception, San Francisco, CA  Corian, steel, wood, 6 ea. 17x18x60 in  Six oval benches together constitute a unique “hour planes” sundial. Each is aligned with the sun according to the hour it represents, ie. 10am, 11am, Noon, 1pm, 2pm or 3pm solar time. 40 minutes before and after the corresponding hour, sunlight projects through the 9 in. slit aperture onto the ground, indicating time and date. When the yellow window, or nodus, in the slit of light crosses the line created by the row of white markers on the ground, it is the solar hour.    Scientific and cultural aspects of time and sundials are also depicted on each bench.

with Astro-biologist Woody Sullivan

The Terrace Observatory, Exploratorium: Museum of Science, Art and Perception, San Francisco, CA

Corian, steel, wood, 6 ea. 17x18x60 in

Six oval benches together constitute a unique “hour planes” sundial. Each is aligned with the sun according to the hour it represents, ie. 10am, 11am, Noon, 1pm, 2pm or 3pm solar time. 40 minutes before and after the corresponding hour, sunlight projects through the 9 in. slit aperture onto the ground, indicating time and date. When the yellow window, or nodus, in the slit of light crosses the line created by the row of white markers on the ground, it is the solar hour.  

Scientific and cultural aspects of time and sundials are also depicted on each bench.

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OCULUS TABLE, 2013

 with Astro-biologist Woody Sullivan  Steel, vinyl, glass, 33x28x28 in  The Terrace Observatory, Exploratorium: Museum of Science, Art and Perception, San Francisco, CA.  Conceived for visitor interaction with the architectural oculus (a 28” aperture) in the ceiling. Visitors align the rolling table with the spot of sunlight and visible landmarks on the horizon. Time and date are indicated by the shadow cast on the interior of the large hemisphere.

with Astro-biologist Woody Sullivan

Steel, vinyl, glass, 33x28x28 in

The Terrace Observatory, Exploratorium: Museum of Science, Art and Perception, San Francisco, CA.

Conceived for visitor interaction with the architectural oculus (a 28” aperture) in the ceiling. Visitors align the rolling table with the spot of sunlight and visible landmarks on the horizon. Time and date are indicated by the shadow cast on the interior of the large hemisphere.

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Fitting, 2016

 Steel, paint, rubber, glass  Delridge Combined Sewer Overflow 169, Seattle Public Utilities and the Office of Arts & Culture, Seattle: SW Barton & Henderson St.  Two water gate valves, similar to those used by SPU, have been converted into camera obscuras. The cameras are playful, interactive devices that can be swiveled for 350˚ panoramic views to invert the view and turn the neighborhood upside down.

Steel, paint, rubber, glass

Delridge Combined Sewer Overflow 169, Seattle Public Utilities and the Office of Arts & Culture, Seattle: SW Barton & Henderson St.

Two water gate valves, similar to those used by SPU, have been converted into camera obscuras. The cameras are playful, interactive devices that can be swiveled for 350˚ panoramic views to invert the view and turn the neighborhood upside down.

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Skylight Aperture Sundial, 2006

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Seattle Public Library: Montlake Branch

Glass, skylight, steel: skylight 15x5ft, glass discs 20 in.

5 glass discs in the ceiling (covered by a large skylight) project a row of colorful sunspots that slide through the library as the sun appears to move from East to West.

The orange disc is the “nodus” or time indicator.  As its projection crosses a line on the library floor, it is solar noon. Floor markings indicate where this sunspot lands at noon on the summer solstice, the opening date of the library––and the equinoxes. By night, artificial lights illuminate the colored discs.

In the 17th and 18th century, astronomers installed single apertures in European cathedrals for astronomical observations. Likewise, the Library is now a small observatory that makes the earth’s movements publicly visible and meaningful.

Commission by the Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs & the Seattle Public Library.  

Project Partners: Weinstein Architects. Consultant: Woody Sullivan.  Permanent installation.

 

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Detail, looking east

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 Solar noon marking, installation opening

Solar noon marking, installation opening

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